A New Start, Courtesy of the Best Job Recruiter in the Universe

I’m back, and I sincerely apologize for my long absence! I’ve had a bunch of challenges over the past several years, but many, many opportunities for personal and spiritual growth. In this blog I’ll try to get you caught up bit by bit on what’s happened to me and what God is doing in my life.

The gist of it is that a few years ago the Lord placed me in a really great job, but I allowed that job to consume all my time and distract me from my focus on Him and my calling. Later, though, after humbling myself through submission and prayer, God gave me another job – the best job I could ever ask for.

At the time it happens, we don’t always see why we’re placed somewhere, but there’s always a reason and a time for learning. In fact, for the last 20 years or so, I had seen God place me time and time again in jobs that seemingly had no unifying thread. Over time, though, I began to recognize a supernatural pattern. God was placing me in place after place so that I could finally achieve my life’s desire to spend more of my time with Him.
This last job, however, was a real test. I mean, I knew I was there for a reason, and over time I came to realize that it was partly the Lord building my work knowledge and confidence so He could possibly move me to something better. Looking back, I could also see that I had that particular job so I could take care of the household finances while my husband worked on his frequently non-paying job, which is what he often calls “God’s Project.” It involves making sure people aren’t in jail just for being poor, but that’ll have to be the subject of another blog. Still, my job was hard.

It wasn’t like I didn’t belong there. In fact, when it came down to that job, I was uniquely qualified for it due both to world credentials (I’m an accountant), and spiritual gifts. My main gift, by the way, is administration, which apparently can be really helpful in the natural world – I don’t know, there just seems to be a lot of chaos that can use a bit of administering! Trying to use your own unique spiritual gifts in the world can also be really satisfying, which is why I constantly urge people to discover their gifts and try to weave them into your daily lives.

Over time, though, I could tell I was letting the “world” part of the job eclipse whatever spiritual benefits I could derive from using my gifts to help others. I worked long (60-70 hours per week), and hard (I actually got a bunch of natural world awards and commendations for how hard I worked), but I could tell my priorities were way off track. I missed God. And physically I was becoming a bit of a wreck. I found myself seeking worldly approval, even though the Bible clearly warns against seeking praise from men over praise from God. (John 12:43)

In fact, about this time I started to clearly see the enemy hard at work in my life. I’ve always been a bit of a workaholic, type A, perfectionist – you know the type, and maybe you can relate. Well, Satan definitely knows that type of person, and he’s quite willing to load them down with just enough work to make them think they’re doing good, but with too much work to spend time seeking God. That was me. Loaded down with tons of work, scrambling over deadlines, and with absolutely no time for God. And it’s not like I didn’t do anything about it. I prayed. I tried to keep myself walking in the Spirit. I even rebuked demons, but WOW the evil one was busy! I felt like I was in the second inning of a 1,000-inning baseball game with no mercy rule! All of this caused me to start losing sight of my dream, which is to minister and train others about the supernatural (you know, Arming the Saints!).

Fortunately, I was often reminded of the line, “Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God, trust also in me.” (John 14:1) And so I knew I could trust God to move me when the time was right. In fact, He usually gives me big, supernatural signs when it’s time to actually leave. In my book, I talk about seeing the supernatural and doing the natural in tandem with God. Well, the way God works with me is that He shows me it’s time to move, I do the natural world work to get the job (you know, apply and everything), and when I’m following His lead, He lines everything up so that it moves quickly and with supernatural ease. In this case, all I had to do is pray to God, submitting to His will and timing in my life concerning my work. Suddenly, within about one week, someone I knew (a sister in Christ) retired from her job, called me on the phone, and told me that I should apply for her old job. I did, and I got the new job faster than any other job in my life.

This is where I really had to push past the natural-world-praise thing. From the world’s point of view, this job looked like a step down. It was less of a title, less money, seeming less of everything. But I accepted it. And wouldn’t you know? As soon as I started working there, God showed me how wonderful the new job was, how much time I would now have to devote to Him and His word, and how little I needed the money! Looking back, I can honestly say this job was custom made for me, brought to me supernaturally, and designed to afford me the time to continue with my walk. I even feel better physically! With this new job, I have a new start. And with a new start, I can get back to investing in all of our spiritual growth.

I suppose the moral of this blog is that no matter where you are or what you’re going through, getting back to basics by pressing into God through submission and prayer can turn your life completely around. Specifically, if you’re in a job that’s consuming you and you feel your grip on your spiritual life is slipping, now’s the time to get on your knees and ask our Lord where He wants you to go and what He wants you to do. Then be prepared to humble yourself. That might mean a worldly, status/title change and pay cut, but it’ll be worth it. In the end, God will provide for you and your family, and the whole thing will provide you with a spiritual lesson that can help you in the future.
If you need a new job, or really any job, pray and believe for a new start, a do-over. Seek guidance from God, and you’ll quickly receive supernatural guidance from the best job recruiter in the Universe!

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False Prophets and Political Christians

I have seen a definite rise in false prophets and so-called “political Christians,” which are those people who use the Bible to defend or justify mostly political issues without much consideration of what Jesus actually said. I have also seen: a number of people using ministries to spread political Christian messages; politicians talking about the “evangelical vote;” and folks acting like simply because the President sat in a room while some people prayed and took pictures, he must somehow be a follower of Jesus.

Watch out, Saints. End times prophesy predicts the rise of false prophets, and so we shouldn’t really be surprised by that. But remember that, whenever anyone uses God or the Bible to justify a particular political, legal, or social issue, Jesus was neither Republican nor Democrat. He is both conservative and liberal, and would likely find fault with parts of both sides. Line everything up to Him. Line it up to love.

By the way, we had to stop giving to a particular Christian legal organization because it slowly crossed that line between doing purely God’s work in this world to representing radically conservative views that only hurt God’s people. Normally I would spot such a change, but I got caught off guard on that one.

Right before the election, I said the current president wouldn’t win, but that if he did, we should watch out because it meant it was a supernatural event. Now that we’re in it, start brushing up on your supernatural principles, end times prophesy, and what you will personally do to get ready.

Denise and I have been a bit too busy to write. She has an excuse, as she works more than anyone I know. But I did want to mention that my new album was just released and it’s being rejected more than usual by the secular radio (probably because I have scripture on the cover and tunes with titles like, “Come Holy Spirit”). It’s still doing pretty good (on 135 stations) but I’m convinced this relative rejection is due to the word “Christian” and what the false prophets have done to it. Every time, for example, a group of us lays hands on the president and acts like everything is okay — i.e., that he actually believes in what’s going on and is somehow following the teachings of Jesus on a daily basis — makes people think that we followers of Jesus don’t know what we’re even talking about.

The Song of the Fittest?

So there I was, reading a piece about what makes music memorable, when a guy says, “The reason we get earworms [super memorable phrases of music] in the first place is probably because music is an evolutionary adaptation, helping us to preserve factual and emotional information in an easily memorizable medium.”

Wrong. And it proves that the guy who said it isn’t a musician.

First, who here constantly uses music to preserve factual and emotional information?  For facts, I’ve occasionally seen people setting them to music, but mostly there are about a hundred other mnemonic devises for preserving factual information that are better suited to the task. And while music might trigger emotions, it’s certainly not the best way to preserve them. In fact, music adds emotions even to the past ones it triggers. It’s constantly moving.

Anyone who’s a musician knows that there is nothing evolutionary about music. It simply doesn’t need to exist to help anyone survive, and it highlights all the failures of the evolutionary argument. For example, if music is evolutionary, then where did F# come from? A more evolved form of a Cb? Is there some long forgotten tone that people used to grunt before they landed on an A? And where is that tone now? Don’t they realize that every single ting of a fork to a glass, every thump of a rock on a tree, is, in some way, music?

And what will music be in a billion years? Oh, the evolutionists say, it will be fantastic but we can’t know, just like we can’t know what it was billions and billions of years ago. That’s the glory of thinking of such huge periods of time. You don’t have to answer anything. There is absolutely nothing random about music – the complexity and math alone underlying the whole thing clearly points to a creator.

In fact, music seems only to have the purpose of expressing all those various human emotions, whether they’re based on memory or not, and glorifying God. After all, it’s a gift from God, and its supernatural nature is exactly why so many musicians – versus, say, actors or other artsy types – constantly thank God when they get awards.

I don’t mind when scientists study music. In fact, I welcome it. But don’t say it’s in any way related to the concept of naturalist evolution.

Making God a Viable Option

I like science and scientists. As a Christian, I welcome the scientific inquiry because ultimately I think science will prove the existence of God for some people who don’t think we have enough proof already.

But there are a couple things that stand in the way of that. The first is that scientists don’t always consider God to be a plausible scientific hypothesis or theory. Science works by people proposing a hypothesis or theory and then by scientists conducting experiments designed to support or reject the theory. This is good, but if the evidence starts to stack up against a given theory, scientists ultimately have to switch to a new theory. The problem is that if the ultimate question revolves around how our universe was created, there are only a few theories out there. One theory is that God created the universe, but scientists frequently don’t accept that as a valid theory to begin with. That’s why you can have so much evidence staking up against the theory of evolution without anyone saying, “Hey, we need to focus on a better theory.” So far, they don’t have a better theory in the natural world, and God is in the supernatural. So even if we have a ton of naturalistic data pointing to the existence of God (which we do), it’s like that data doesn’t exist.

The second thing that stands in the way of science proving God are certain scientists who really hate God or religion so much that they’ll do about anything not only to keep themselves from considering it, but to keep others from doing so, too.

That’s the case with a guy I heard on Science Friday on PBS recently. He wrote a book about physics, but he simply couldn’t stop from making disparaging remarks about religion and God. Even the title of his book, “The Greatest Story Ever Told So Far” is a dig at those of us who believe in Jesus Christ. He called that “other story” static – which means he has never read the Bible – and a few other things that made me think that even though he’s a scientist, there are simply certain things that he refuses to consider.  I’m just not sure what drives a person to hate God so much that he’ll publicly dis Him, and it’s sad.

But then I realized the author’s main issue, which appeared to be in the way in which he perceived “religious” people and religion in general, especially in this new American world of a so-called Christian President who lies and hates all the time (he spent a bit of time talking political). And, you know, he’s got a point. We have done a horrible job at explaining what true Christianity is, and we’ve allowed people to claim they’re Christians even as they act extremely un-Christian. Overall, we’ve allowed so-called “religion” to muck up everything Jesus taught. We’ve also allowed so-called “political Christians” to twist Jesus’s words to achieve certain political goals. And we’ve done a lot of hateful things, all while attending church and Sunday school with the kids. This author is Jewish, too, and so I suppose we’ve also done a pretty poor job at explaining God’s purpose and plan for his chosen people.

So we’ve got to start explaining God in ways that keep scientists and others from recoiling in disgust.  I’m convinced that if we did, scientists like the one on the show would begin to lighten up on trying to get everyone to stop believing, and maybe even consider God a viable theory worthy of scientific inquiry. But to do that, we may need to clean house a bit and toss out some of the “religion” and the Christian pretenders.

This country is being torn apart. Two sides exist that hate each other, and can’t see past their own biases to find solutions. Accordingly, some group has to emerge in the middle to bring them back together; a group that can show that both left and right are both right and wrong for different reasons. A group that can explain why it believes what it believes, and show people how to act in a way that is not hypocritical. That group should be Christians, but we have too many people just giving lip service to following Jesus for anyone to take us seriously.

Jesus said, “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven.” If we can convince people we follow the God of love, not hate – love even for those we disagree with – and the God of truth and light, and not falsehoods and darkness, I think people will be much more open to Him. So let’s start where we are. Start looking at everyone – including people who hate God and want you to hate Him too – as if they were you. You know, empathy. The Golden Rule. We believe in the God of love. Now it’s just time we started to act like it.

Yeah, I know, science throws a fit when I say it might “prove” God. Nothing is ever truly provable, science says. But we can at least get to the point where we portray the true God of the Bible through our thoughts, words, and actions. If we do that, we can at least make God a viable option.

2,000 Years Ago

In Denise’s book, 7 Spiritual Truths and the Lies That Hide Them, she says that one day science will ultimately prove the existence of God. She’s right, but until that happens, consider what I heard yesterday on the radio.

It was Science Friday, with Ira Flatow, and he was replaying a 1999 broadcast in which the scientists were talking about expansion of the universe. Throughout the twentieth century, scientists had been confident that the expanding universe, as discovered by Edwin Hubble, was nonetheless slowing down due to gravity, which Einstein’s theory predicted as a constant even on a cosmic scale. Nevertheless, in the late 1990s scientists discovered that the universe was not slowing down at all. No, in fact, it was speeding up, which was kind of a big change in our thinking, if you ask me. They seemed to take this rather massive change in thinking in stride, though, as they moved toward discussing some then-recent scientific data.

Ira then asked one particular scientist, based on the new data, how confident she was about the age of the universe. She replied that much of the recent data, including data further confirming a “flat universe” theory (which, by the way, sort of blew Ira’s mind) led to a “robust” prediction of the date the universe began. So basically, she was confident about the age of the universe. But the interesting thing, to me, was that this confidence came without any mention of the fact that until the 1990s, scientists had been completely wrong about the whole deal. I know, that’s the way science works, and Denise talks about it in the book.

But all of this reminds me of one thing. I’m not altogether certain whether science will confirm or refute the existence of God in your lifetime. For all I know, in 2092 scientists will say that they were wrong in 1999, and that the universe is slowing, but backward, and that the system is closed, but infinitely so. I can guarantee, however, that in our own lifetimes (or shortly thereafter) we will definitively find for ourselves about the existence of God.

My point is that it may take a long time for science to get its act together to explain God’s existence. We can wait for science to catch up, or we can listen to God Himself, who came to earth through the birth of Jesus Christ 2,000 years ago to tell us, face to face, the real mysteries of the universe.

Stay strong and keep building your faith. And Merry Christmas, Everybody!

A Supernatural 2016 Election?

I’ve been really busy and so I’ve been having a hard time lately with this blog. For the most part, that’s because I really only ever wanted to talk about positive things, and not get down in the negative gutter about Christian issues. Even though I occasionally rag on Darwin Speak, I do it to uplift people so that they won’t let anyone tear God down.

But lately the only stuff in the news deals with the ugliest presidential election I’ve ever seen. This has been weighing on me, so I’m going to post this one negative blog and be done with it.

The other day, Donald Trump was at a rally where he asked all “Conservative Christians” to raise their hands. Apparently, he thinks all “Conservative Christians” are for him, because when some didn’t raise their hands, he said, “Well, I suppose we can let them stay,” or something like that. In the story about this meeting, the reporter also talked about Trump’s support by “Evangelical Christians.” All these labels got me thinking about a few basic notions.

I’ve posted this first notion many, many times, so it shouldn’t be a surprise; I’m sick of the term “Conservative Christians.” If Jesus were here, he would undoubtedly show people that he is extremely conservative on some things, and extremely liberal on others. People who identify as “Conservative Christians” only, are thus missing exactly half the message. “Conservative Christians,” to me, are probably better defined as “Political Christians,” and I would never want to be called that. Political Christians use the Bible only when it suits their interests. They pick choose, and in no way did Jesus ever say, “You can use whatever suits you – feel free to disregard some of my teachings if they don’t line up with your world.”

This next notion, though, is new to this blog, which deals with what it means to be an “Evangelical Christian.” To me, if you’re an Evangelical Christian, then you believe in the Bible and all it teaches, and you feel you have a responsibility to help others understand the good news presented in it. That much is clear. But if you believe in the Bible and all it teaches, you must be able to see that the Republican nominee for president is about as far away from the Bible and what it teaches – about as far away from Jesus as a model – as someone can possibly be. In a previous blog, I already wrote that one of the central tenants of Donald Trump’s existence is his belief in doing unto others as or before they do unto you, which is, by the way, a central tenet of Satanism. And since I wrote that blog, I’ve seen one thing after another that makes me think that he could care less about any person other than himself. Certainly not his neighbor, and certainly not God. In short, there’s virtually nothing that this nominee does that in any way looks or feels like something Jesus would do (by the way, I wrote this draft about a week ago – before the amazingly vulgar things reported yesterday). The Bible talks about recognizing certain people by their fruits, and by fruits it doesn’t mean money, or structures, or any other natural world things. It means by their spiritual fruits. Unfortunately, in the case of Mr. Trump, the fruit tree is incredibly barren, maybe even dead. Yes, God loves Donald Trump, and yes, Evangelical Christians should attempt to reach him and minister to him. But for goodness sake, they should never vote for him.

Now this last notion is based on the fact that this blog is designed for Christians, and, in particular, Christians who are charismatic and open to the supernatural in their lives. If you aren’t, then I can guarantee that you’ll simply find what I have to say silly. But here goes. In supernatural and charismatic circles, I’m what’s called a prophet in the church, which only means that I’m really good at sensing good and evil in people and situations around me. And folks, let me tell you that the Republican nominee for president of the United States is operating mostly – if not entirely – out of evil. Some say he has a demon, which is probably true since most demons are incredibly dumb and often tip their hands, which makes them easier to spot. No, I don’t think he’s the antichrist, because the antichrist is supposed to be pretty smart.

But here’s the bigger deal, supernaturally speaking. We all know that God runs everything, and so if this nominee – a person who continually, day after day, does about a million things that would normally disqualify any other candidate for doing only one – actually wins this election, you will most definitely know that it’s a supernatural event. And if it’s that much of a big-deal, supernatural event, then watch out because that means that God wanted him in there for a reason. I believe we’re getting quite close to what we all call the End Times, and electing a president who is more capable than most of triggering events leading to those End Times is something that actually makes a bit of sense in an otherwise crazy, nonsensical election.

Oh, and because someone once questioned my street cred, politically speaking, I should tell you that my family is and was incredibly political. My grandfather was Republican Party Chairman for Kansas and ran around with Alf Landon, who was the Republican nominee for President in 1936. My dad was the state’s youngest party chairman ever, and gave a nominating speech at the Republican National Convention in 1968. I grew up attending conventions, party meetings, and various political campaign events. I worked on countless campaigns before I knew any better, and a presidential campaign when I did know better. My brother worked on two. I’ve been registered as a Republican since I was 18, even though I don’t always vote that way and I vote so less and less every year.

I say all this merely to note that in the natural world I suppose I’m a Republican. In the supernatural world, though, I’m a follower of Jesus, which means I’m neither Republican nor Democrat. I’m a follower of Jesus. I suppose most would call that a Christian, and maybe even an Evangelical or Charismatic Christian, but I’m definitely not “conservative” or a “liberal” Christian. And in any event, I can’t possibly vote for Donald Trump.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multiverse Schmultiverse

uni

Today on PBS I heard a guy say that he was writing a science fiction book about a parallel universe — part of a so-called “multiverse” — but he was excited to find out that it might not be fiction at all. He said there was actually real science behind the idea of a multiverse. This, of course, went unquestioned by the host of the radio program.

The theory of a multiverse was created by people who don’t believe in God and who were presented with pretty strong evidence of universal fine tuning. Unlike the science showing fine tuning, the idea of a multiverse isn’t science so much as it’s just a theory that hopes one day to be science. But people float theories for a lot of reasons, including trying to hang on to flawed worldviews.

I saw a documentary recently that quoted a scientist as saying that the evidence of universal fine tuning actually led him to question everything he believed on a fundamental level. That’s because if something is fine tuned, it requires a fine tuner, who is God. And I don’t think this guy wanted to believe in God. And, as I wrote before, if you make scientists question their beliefs in fundamental ways, they are likely to come up with a theory that can bring them back to where they were before. A multiverse — which is the idea of billions of universes happening all at once — would mean that fine tuning might only look like fine tuning. In reality, according to the theory, it would really be random given the billions of universes that are going on all at once. As David Lane Craig said, it’s like the idea that if you deal the cards enough times, every hand will eventually come up sooner or later, no matter how unlikely.

The problem is that sometimes a theory can take on a life of it’s own. Kind of like Darwinian evolution, which is possibly the biggest lie still routinely taught to our children.

So I say multiverse, schmultiverse. It’s just a theory, and sort of an outlandish one at that. Don’t be conned by these subtle discussions that, perhaps even unwittingly, tend to chip away at our strong belief in God. Look it up, and you’ll see what’s behind it.


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